Patient Education Blog

Savaysa (Edoxaban): New Oral Blood Thinner

Stephan Moll writes…

Savaysa® (Edoxaban), the 4th of the big new oral blood thinners in development (the other big 3 being Dabigatran = Pradaxa, Rivaroxaban = Xarelto, and Apixaban = Eliquis), is now commercially available in Japan (July 19th, 2011 press release here). It is available as once daily dosing for prevention of blood clots in the legs and lungs (DVT and PE) after major orthopedic surgeries (hip and knee replacement and hip fracture surgery). Edoxaban is a synthetic drug directed against clotting factor Xa (i.e. an anti-Xa drug). It is being developed by Daiichi. It is NOT FDA approved in the U.S. at this point and not available.

Even though this does not have any practical consequences for patients in the U.S. at this point, this is still interesting and relevant news. It increases the number of new oral blood thinners that do not need routine monitoring of their blood thinning effect and have made it through the clinical development stages to come onto the market.

The phase 3 clinical trials that led to the approval of edoxaban in Japan have not yet been published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. As for treatment of DVT and PE: A huge 7,500 patient phase 3 clinical trial with Edoxaban- Hokusai trial -  is presently ongoing and enrolling (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00986154) – enrollment is anticipated to continue for another year (until September 2012).

 

Disclosures: I have consulted for Daiichi, the company developing Edoxaban.

Last updated: Jan 27th, 2014

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One Response to “Savaysa (Edoxaban): New Oral Blood Thinner”

  1. Renee Rogers says:

    Presently treated with Coumadin due to antithrombin III deficiency. Have experienced third episode of DVT in leg(s). Suffered brain bleed in 2010 but recovered fully. Hoping the new drug will benefit people with my condition soon.

    Thank you so much for your contribution.