Patient Education Blog

Archive for the ‘Prevention’ Category

DVT and PE Prevention when Admitted to the Hospital

| Guidelines, Prevention | Comments Off on DVT and PE Prevention when Admitted to the Hospital

Stephan Moll, MD writes (on12/5/2014)… Prevention of DVT and PE in patients who are in the hospital is important.  Hospitals are required to have mechanisms in place that guarantee that patients at risk for DVT and PE get appropriate prophylaxis [reference].  We have developed at the University of North Carolina (UNC) a guidance document (link here; UNC VTE prophylaxis guidance document) as a resource for our doctors to assist in making decisions on which patients to give what type of DVT and PE prophylaxis.  We are making this document available for other doctors and hospitals, to use it as is or modify it as needed.

Recommendations provided in this document are a reflection of current guidelines, clinical evidence, and UNC institutional initiatives.  Patients may look at this document to see what kind of DVT prophylaxis might be appropriate in certain situations, such as surgeries; and they should discuss appropriate prophylaxis with their physicians.  However, this document is not intended to replace individual patient evaluation and management decisions.

Reference

Joint Commission VTE measures (link here)

Disclosures: None

Last updated: Dec 5th, 2014

FDA to review the drug Eliquis (apixaban) for DVT/PE treatment and prevention

| Blood thinners (anticoagulants), Eliquis - Apixaban, Prevention, Therapy | Comments Off on FDA to review the drug Eliquis (apixaban) for DVT/PE treatment and prevention

Stephan Moll, MD writes… Another ‘blood thinner’ medication is now under consideration by the FDA for the treatment of DVT and PE.

On Dec 19th the FDA accepted the application by Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) and Pfizer for review of Eliquis (apixaban) for the treatment of DVT and PE and for the reduction in the risk of recurrent DVT and PE.  The goal date for a decision by the FDA is August 25, 2014.  The press release about this submission from BMS is hereRead the rest of this entry »

Natural supplements, herbs, vitamins and food: do any prevent blood clots?

| Blood thinners (anticoagulants), Herbal remedies, Prevention, Therapy, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Natural supplements, herbs, vitamins and food: do any prevent blood clots?

Beth Waldron, Clot Connect Program Director and Stephan Moll, MD, Clot Connect Medical Director write….

Patients who have ended their recommended course of prescription anticoagulation treatment are understandably concerned about a clot recurrence and will ask “is there anything I can do to prevent a future clot?” Some have heard from friends or the internet that a particular herb, vitamin, or food will aid in the prevention of DVT and PE.

Since more than half of adults in the United States take a dietary supplement of some kind, it may be helpful to examine the science behind some of the most common natural supplements and foods said to prevent blood clots.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

Top clinically relevant publications for patients from 2012

| Blood thinners (anticoagulants), Prevention, Therapy | Comments Off on Top clinically relevant publications for patients from 2012

Beth Waldron and Stephan Moll, MD write….

While much is known about blood clots and clotting disorders, there is still much being learnt.  Medical information changes over time as new clinical trials, research studies and evidence-based guidelines contribute to knowledge of and treatments for blood clots and clotting disorders.  Many of today’s standards of treatment are based upon what was learned from publications in the past.

Over the past year, a number of publications emerged which will influence future clinical decisions and potentially impact your care. Here is a summary of the ‘top clinically relevant publications from 2012’ and how they may affect you. Read the rest of this entry »

Behind the headlines: Does eating lunch at your desk increase blood clot risk?

| Prevention, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Behind the headlines: Does eating lunch at your desk increase blood clot risk?

Beth Waldron,  Program Director of Clot Connect, writes…

The claim:  “Eating lunch at your desk could increase your risk of DVT”—was the dramatic headline from UK’s Marie Claire magazine which caught my attention. (1)  The online story went on to say that “Almost 75 per cent of office staff aged 21-30 who work 10-hour days don’t get up to take a break. This could double chances of a fatal blood clot.”  The story was light on citing scientific evidence to back up this claim, so, as someone interested in DVT education (and admittedly, who eats at her desk routinely), I decided to investigate if this assertion is true:  Does eating lunch at your desk increase blood clot risk? Read the rest of this entry »

Hip and Knee Replacement – DVT Prevention – New Guideline

| Prevention | Comments Off on Hip and Knee Replacement – DVT Prevention – New Guideline

Two main guidelines exist which many physicians go by to decide whether a particular patient should get DVT prophylaxis after hip or knee replacement surgery, what method (compression device, or drug) to use, and for how long to give prophylaxis.  (a) One is the ACCP guideline (American College of Chest Physicians), last published in June 2008 [ref 1].  An updated version is expected to be published around February 2012.  (b) The other one is the AAOS guideline Read the rest of this entry »

Long Distance Travel and Blood Clots

| Acquired risk factors, Prevention | 1 Comment »

Stephan Moll, MD writes…

Long distance travel, either by plane, car, bus or train, is a slight risk factor for DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and PE (pulmonary embolism). The risk is low. However, there are some people who are at higher risk.  In these people compression stockings and/or a dose of an oral blood thinner ( Xarelto, Pradaxa) or one injection of a low-dose “blood thinner” (low molecular weight heparin, fondaparinux) may be appropriate. It is not known whether aspirin Read the rest of this entry »