Patient Education Blog

Archive for the ‘Venous clots’ Category

IVC Filters, May-Thurner Syndrome, Pelvic Vein Stents

| Anatomy, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), IVC filters, Postthrombotic syndrome, Therapy | Comments Off on IVC Filters, May-Thurner Syndrome, Pelvic Vein Stents

Stephan Moll, MD writes… An article for patients discussing (a) IVC filters (inferior vena cava filters; also often referred to as “Greenfield filters”), (b) narrowing of the main left pelvic vein (referred to as May-Thurner syndrome) and (c) stents in veins in the pelvis has just been published (http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/133/6/e383.full.pdf).  Color images are included helping explain what these conditions are.

Reference:  Carroll S, Moll S. Circulation. 2016;133:e383-e387

 

Last updated: Feb 18th, 2016

Study for Patients with Previous Leg DVT and Chronic Leg Symptoms

| Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Postthrombotic syndrome, Trials | Comments Off on Study for Patients with Previous Leg DVT and Chronic Leg Symptoms

Stephan Moll, MD writes…  A clinical research study is being conducted in the U.S. for the treatment of chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and is open for enrollment.  It is referred to as ACCESS-PTS.  Read the rest of this entry »

Catheter-Associated Blood Clots of Arm and Neck in Patients With Cancer

| Clots in unusual locations, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Venous clots | Comments Off on Catheter-Associated Blood Clots of Arm and Neck in Patients With Cancer

Stephan Moll, MD writes… Patients with cancer may have catheters in veins in their upper chest, neck or arm (central venous catheter,  port), to enable chemotherapy, fluids or blood products to be given. These catheters increase a patient’s risk for developing an arm or neck clot (DVT) leading to arm or neck swelling, pain, and may be warmth and reddish discoloration. Typically, blood thinners are used in this situation to prevent the clot from getting bigger or breaking off and traveling to the lung to cause a lung clot (pulmonary embolism; PE). Limited data exist how to best manage these catheter-associated DVTs.

This week (Feb 18th, 2014) a guidance document on the prevention and management of catheter-associated upper extremity and neck  DVT was published by one of the respected medical societies (International Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis; ISTH) [ref 1].

A summary of the conclusions and treatment recommendations for health care professionals has been published on Clot Connect here.

 

Reference

Zwicker JI et al. Catheter-associated deep vein thrombosis of the upper extremity in cancer patients: guidance from the SSC of the ISTH. Feb 18th, 2014 (pre-published on the web) – link to abstract here.

 

Disclosures:  I have no relevant financial disclosures.

Last updated:  Feb 20th, 2014

New Publication: Eliquis (Apixaban) is Effective and Safe in DVT and PE

| Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Eliquis - Apixaban, Pulmonary embolism, Trials, Venous clots | Comments Off on New Publication: Eliquis (Apixaban) is Effective and Safe in DVT and PE

Stephan Moll, MD writes…

An important study (called AMPLIFY trial) was published today in the New England Journal of Medicine [ref 1].  In a large study of patients with acute DVT or PE, Eliquis (apixaban) was as effective as warfarin and caused less major bleeding. Read the rest of this entry »

Diagnosis of recurrent DVT and PE: A patient’s guide to the clinical care guidance used by healthcare professionals

| Diagnosis, Guidelines, Uncategorized, Venous clots | Comments Off on Diagnosis of recurrent DVT and PE: A patient’s guide to the clinical care guidance used by healthcare professionals

Beth Waldron, Clot Connect program director, writes…

If you’ve experienced deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), a recurrence of a blood clot in the future is a concern.   Diagnosing a recurrent clot can be a challenge because it is sometimes difficult to tell if symptoms are the result of a new clot or the signs of chronic damage from the initial clot.

  • Around 40% of patients with DVT develop long-term pain and swelling, known as post-thrombotic syndrome.  Such pain and swelling can fluctuate, and be particularly pronounced after standing for prolonged periods of time or being overly active.
How do healthcare professionals know when symptoms are the result of a past blood clot or due to a new clot?  Read the rest of this entry »

Ischemic Colitis and Thrombophilia

| Clots in unusual locations | Comments Off on Ischemic Colitis and Thrombophilia

 Stephan Moll, MD writes…

Ischemic colitis is an uncommon disorder. It is typically not dangerous and resolves without treatment. For mostly unclear reasons multiple small or tiny blood vessels in the wall of the intestine (the large intestine = colon) have decreased blood flow or become blocked by small blood clots.  This results in a lack of blood flow and oxygen delivery (ischemia = Latin for impaired oxygen supply) to a number of small areas of the intestinal wall.  This leads patchy, superficial damage of the colon wall results.  The damage areas often heal by themselves and no surgery is needed.  The patient recovers spontaneously within a week or two.  Often people have only one episode. Few people have two or more bouts. Read the rest of this entry »

Aspirin Prevents Recurrent DVT and PE

| Aspirin, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary embolism, Therapy | Comments Off on Aspirin Prevents Recurrent DVT and PE

 Stephan Moll, MD writes… An important study was published on May 23rd, 2012 in the New England Journal of Medicine [ref 1], showing that aspirin decreases the risk of recurrent clots (DVT and PE) in patients who have had a previous unprovoked (= idiopathic) clot and who have completed 6 to 18 months of blood thinner therapy. Aspirin did not lead to an apparent increase in risk of major bleeding Read the rest of this entry »