Patient Education Blog

Archive for the ‘Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)’ Category

IVC Filters, May-Thurner Syndrome, Pelvic Vein Stents

| Anatomy, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), IVC filters, Postthrombotic syndrome, Therapy | Comments Off on IVC Filters, May-Thurner Syndrome, Pelvic Vein Stents

Stephan Moll, MD writes… An article for patients discussing (a) IVC filters (inferior vena cava filters; also often referred to as “Greenfield filters”), (b) narrowing of the main left pelvic vein (referred to as May-Thurner syndrome) and (c) stents in veins in the pelvis has just been published (http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/133/6/e383.full.pdf).  Color images are included helping explain what these conditions are.

Reference:  Carroll S, Moll S. Circulation. 2016;133:e383-e387

 

Last updated: Feb 18th, 2016

Study for Patients with Previous Leg DVT and Chronic Leg Symptoms

| Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Postthrombotic syndrome, Trials | Comments Off on Study for Patients with Previous Leg DVT and Chronic Leg Symptoms

Stephan Moll, MD writes…  A clinical research study is being conducted in the U.S. for the treatment of chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and is open for enrollment.  It is referred to as ACCESS-PTS.  Read the rest of this entry »

Catheter-Associated Blood Clots of Arm and Neck in Patients With Cancer

| Clots in unusual locations, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Venous clots | Comments Off on Catheter-Associated Blood Clots of Arm and Neck in Patients With Cancer

Stephan Moll, MD writes… Patients with cancer may have catheters in veins in their upper chest, neck or arm (central venous catheter,  port), to enable chemotherapy, fluids or blood products to be given. These catheters increase a patient’s risk for developing an arm or neck clot (DVT) leading to arm or neck swelling, pain, and may be warmth and reddish discoloration. Typically, blood thinners are used in this situation to prevent the clot from getting bigger or breaking off and traveling to the lung to cause a lung clot (pulmonary embolism; PE). Limited data exist how to best manage these catheter-associated DVTs.

This week (Feb 18th, 2014) a guidance document on the prevention and management of catheter-associated upper extremity and neck  DVT was published by one of the respected medical societies (International Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis; ISTH) [ref 1].

A summary of the conclusions and treatment recommendations for health care professionals has been published on Clot Connect here.

 

Reference

Zwicker JI et al. Catheter-associated deep vein thrombosis of the upper extremity in cancer patients: guidance from the SSC of the ISTH. Feb 18th, 2014 (pre-published on the web) – link to abstract here.

 

Disclosures:  I have no relevant financial disclosures.

Last updated:  Feb 20th, 2014

New Publication: Eliquis (Apixaban) is Effective and Safe in DVT and PE

| Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Eliquis - Apixaban, Pulmonary embolism, Trials, Venous clots | Comments Off on New Publication: Eliquis (Apixaban) is Effective and Safe in DVT and PE

Stephan Moll, MD writes…

An important study (called AMPLIFY trial) was published today in the New England Journal of Medicine [ref 1].  In a large study of patients with acute DVT or PE, Eliquis (apixaban) was as effective as warfarin and caused less major bleeding. Read the rest of this entry »

Aspirin Prevents Recurrent DVT and PE

| Aspirin, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary embolism, Therapy | Comments Off on Aspirin Prevents Recurrent DVT and PE

 Stephan Moll, MD writes… An important study was published on May 23rd, 2012 in the New England Journal of Medicine [ref 1], showing that aspirin decreases the risk of recurrent clots (DVT and PE) in patients who have had a previous unprovoked (= idiopathic) clot and who have completed 6 to 18 months of blood thinner therapy. Aspirin did not lead to an apparent increase in risk of major bleeding Read the rest of this entry »

Recovery After a DVT or PE

| Athletes and blood clots, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary embolism, Therapy | Comments Off on Recovery After a DVT or PE

Stephan Moll, MD writes…   Some patients may only have mild symptoms when diagnosed with a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE) and may feel normal again within a few days after initiation of blood thinners.  Patients with more extensive clots and more pronounced symptoms may take several weeks to get back to normal Read the rest of this entry »

DVT in Young Adults – Vena Cava Abnormalities

| Anatomy, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Young adults and blood clots | Comments Off on DVT in Young Adults – Vena Cava Abnormalities

Dr. Stephan Moll writes…..

When a young person is diagnosed with extensive pelvic DVT or a clot in the big vein in the abdomen, the inferior vena cava (IVC), it is worthwhile to ask whether that person has some congenital abnormality of the IVC, such as a congenital absence or narrowing of the IVC Read the rest of this entry »

Incidentally Discovered Blood Clots

| Cancer and blood clots, Clots in unusual locations, Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary embolism | 1 Comment »

General comments

CT scans and MRI scans are often done in medicine, for a variety of reasons.  Every so often such a scan will detect a blood clot in a patient who has no symptoms from the clot. This is referred to as an “incidental VTE”  (VTE = venous thromboembolism, i.e. clot in a vein) or “asymptomatic VTE”.  Such a clot may be a DVT in the pelvis or leg, in the major abdominal vein (vena cava), or in one of the intestinal veins (portal vein, splenic vein, mesenteric vein, or renal vein). When such an incidental, asymptomatic VTE is discovered, the question arises whether the patient should be treated with “blood thinners” or not. Read the rest of this entry »