Patient Education Blog

Posts Tagged ‘factor V Leiden’

Testing for Clotting Disorders – Can It Be Done While on Blood Thinners?

| Acquired risk factors, Antiphospholipid antibodies, Antithrombin deficiency, APC resistance, Clotting disorder - thrombophilia, Factor V Leiden, Inherited (genetic), Protein C deficiency, Protein S deficiency, Prothrombin 20210 mutation | Comments Off on Testing for Clotting Disorders – Can It Be Done While on Blood Thinners?

Stephan Moll, MD writes…  The decision how long to treat a patient who has had a DVT or PE with blood thinners can often be made based just on the patient’s history. Often no testing for clotting disorders (thrombophilias) is needed.  The decision how long to treat is influenced by 3 factors: (1) What is the person’s risk of another clot if he/she is not on blood thinners any more? (2) What is the person’s risk for bleeding on blood thinners? (3) What is the person’s own preference regarding his/her treatment. These issues are discussed in detail here.

However, if one were to do testing, what is the  right time to test? It is important to know that some blood thinners can influence test results.

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Thrombophilia and Insurance

| Clotting disorder - thrombophilia, Inherited (genetic), Psychological and social consequences of blood clots, Thrombophilia lab tests | 4 Comments »

Liz Varga, Certified Genetic Counselor, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus OH writes….

Some people may have concerns about genetic testing for clotting disorders (thrombophilias) for fear of genetic discrimination.  Fortunately in the United States, we have laws in place that can alleviate this concern. Read the rest of this entry »

Pregnancy Loss and Clotting Disorders

| Antiphospholipid antibodies, Antithrombin deficiency, Clotting disorder - thrombophilia, Factor V Leiden, Protein C deficiency, Protein S deficiency, Prothrombin 20210 mutation, Therapy, Women and blood clots | 8 Comments »

How common is pregnancy loss? What are the causes?

Pregnancy loss (= miscarriage) in the general population is common. Most losses occur in the first trimester. As many as 5 % of women have 2 or more early losses; 1-2 % have 3 or more early losses [ref 1]. Well established risk factors for pregnancy loss are: (a) advanced age of the mother, (b) anatomic abnormalities of the uterus (such as fibroids), (c) chromosome abnormalities of fetus, the mother or the father, (d) underlying diseases of the mother (endocrine, immunologic), (e) maternal hormonal unbalances.  The acquired clotting disorder called “antiphospholipid antibody syndrome” is also a risk factor for pregnancy loss. The role of inherited clotting disorders (= thrombophilias) contributing to pregnancy loss is less clear. Read the rest of this entry »

Family Member Testing for Thrombophilia

| Clotting disorder - thrombophilia, Factor V Leiden, Inherited (genetic), Protein C deficiency, Protein S deficiency, Prothrombin 20210 mutation, Thrombophilia lab tests | 4 Comments »

Stephan Moll, MD writes…

Background

If a thrombophilia (clotting disorder) has been identified in a patient with blood clots (venous thromboembolism = VTE), the question arises whether other family members should be tested for the same thrombophilia.

My Clinical Approach

My approach in clinical practice to thrombophilia testing in family members is summarized in table 1:  Testing of Family Members. Read the rest of this entry »

Unexplained Arterial Clots – Causes, Thrombophilia Testing

| Arterial clots, Clotting disorder - thrombophilia | Comments Off on Unexplained Arterial Clots – Causes, Thrombophilia Testing

Stephan Moll, MD writes…

Arteries are the blood vessels that lead blood away from the heart into the periphery, i.e. to the extremities, the brain, the abdominal and pelvic organs. They deliver oxygen to organs and muscles. Veins lead the blood back to the heart, from where it flows into the lung to take up fresh oxygen. Blood clots in arteries can lead to stroke (so called ischemic stroke), heart attacks, or gangrene of the extremities. Blood clots in veins are called superficial thrombophlebitis, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and pulmonary embolism (PE). Read the rest of this entry »